Pro-Tips for attending Islanders games at Barclays

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Crowds are usually larger than this on game nights. But sometimes not.

1. Three ways to buy tickets

  • Resale: The largest number of discounted tickets are available via StubHub and SeatGeek.  Most home games have 1000+ seats available on either site, and in my experience the best time to buy tends to be the day before the game.  Tickets can start to get expensive if you have a larger group, as there is a limited number of seats available together, but one way to work around this is to try to buy seats in rows one behind each other (this is also more conducive for socializing with people in your group who aren’t in the seats directly beside you).
  • Ticketmaster: Especially if you’re looking to get a larger group together, buying seats directly from Ticketmaster might be your best bet. Full view seats start at $29 + fees but can sometimes be as low as $15 depending on demand. You can also save a few dollars buy paying with your Amex.
  • Reply Buy: This service allows fans to purchase last minute tickets via text. Specific offers are usually sent out the day before a game and prices are comparable to those on StubHub or SeatGeek. You also get $10 credit just for signing up.
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Reply Buy: For people who like to live on the edge.

*About Limited View Seats: In the balcony and 100-level, limited view seats (Sections 205-227 and 102-105) block your view of anything that happens from the goal line back (ie goals). So if you come to games to see players score, best to avoid these sections.

In the lower bowl, obstructed view seats in the corner (Sections 1-4, 12, 20, and 28-31) block your view of play in the near corner. The action that happens in these areas is often less consequential than what happens on the goal line, though, so if being closer to the action is really important to you, it might be worth the tradeoff.

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2. Getting into Barclays

  • Print your tickets before you arrive. All tickets must be printed in order to get in the building. The only exception are tickets bought through Reply Buy, which can be scanned through your phone. Tickets purchased on resale apps must be printed (despite what SeatGeek wants you to believe). If you can’t print before you get to the game, the people at Will Call are nice enough to print tickets for you if you show them an order confirmation on your phone.
  • Enter through the back (or side) door. Avoid long lines at security by entering through the Emblem Health Entrance on Dean Street or the VIP American Express Entrance on Atlantic across from Old Navy.
  • Don’t bring your laptop or any other items on Barclay’s prohibited list.

3. During the game

  • Obey Hockey Etiquette. Ushers are instructed not to let fans enter sections during play; really you shouldn’t be allowed to enter if play is about to start (ie when players are lined up for a faceoff), especially if you’re hiking all the way up to Row 22. You should also avoid getting up from your seat until there’s a whistle. TV Timeouts generally happen the first whistle after the 14, 10 and 6-minute mark of a period (unless there’s a Power Play, goal or icing) and can be a great time to make a less crowded bathroom or concession run while missing minimal play.
  • Stand up after Islanders Goals. Peer pressure your friends into doing the same. Then just follow along. It will be awkward at first, but trust me, you’ll come to love it.

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4. After the game

  • If we win, head to 5th Ave and grab a drink at McMahon’s or The Montrose (the former is slightly larger and brighter; the latter has a cool wooden ceiling. Apart from that they’re interchangeable). Or if you’re hungry, grab a slice of Artichoke Pizza for the trip home.
  • If we lose, see above.
  • When you’re ready to go home (to Brooklyn), avoid the congestion at Atlantic Terminal by taking the 2/3/4/5 from Bergen St (the 4/5 makes local stops at night), the C from Lafayette, or the G at Fulton.
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